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bobbycaputo:

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

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(via teacoffeebooks)

houghtonlib:

Gerard, John, 1545-1612. The herball, or, Generall historie of plantes, 1633.

STC 11751

Houghton Library, Harvard University

(via scientificillustration)

libutron:

Nudibranch - Phyllidia varicosa
Native to the Indo-West Pacific Oceans including the central Pacific and the Red Sea, Phyllidia varicosa (Nudibranchia - Phyllidiidae) is probably on of the sea slugs most frequently noticed by divers.
It can be distinguished by its elongate-oval body with three to six longitudinal, blue-gray ridges composed of smooth, yellow-capped tubercles.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Jan Messersmith | Locality: Madang, Papua New Guinea

libutron:

Nudibranch - Phyllidia varicosa

Native to the Indo-West Pacific Oceans including the central Pacific and the Red Sea, Phyllidia varicosa (Nudibranchia - Phyllidiidae) is probably on of the sea slugs most frequently noticed by divers.

It can be distinguished by its elongate-oval body with three to six longitudinal, blue-gray ridges composed of smooth, yellow-capped tubercles.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Jan Messersmith | Locality: Madang, Papua New Guinea

themaninthegreenshirt:

Ella Fitzgerald performs at Mr Kelly’s nightclub, Chicago, Illinois, 1958

themaninthegreenshirt:

Ella Fitzgerald performs at Mr Kelly’s nightclub, Chicago, Illinois, 1958

(via littlehorrorshop)

evocativesynthesis:

Scythian Griffin holding a stag head in its beak. From Pazyryk, Russian Altai mountains, 4th century B.C. Saint Petersburg, State Hermitage Museum. (via petrus.agricola)

evocativesynthesis:

Scythian Griffin holding a stag head in its beak. From Pazyryk, Russian Altai mountains, 4th century B.C. Saint Petersburg, State Hermitage Museum. (via petrus.agricola)

(via libutron)

May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears.

— Nelson Mandela  (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via awelltraveledwoman)

colchrishadfield:

I don’t think this was translated correctly.

colchrishadfield:

I don’t think this was translated correctly.

wapiti3:

Album van Eeden: Haarlem’s flora: images in color of various bulbous and tuberous plants; By AC van Eeden & Co.. Arendsen, Aren Tine H. Erven Loosjes. Severyns, G. ,nl on Flickr.

Publication info
Haarlem: the heirs Loosjes, Haarlem Publishers 0.1872 to 1881.,nl
Contributing Library:
Missouri Botanical Garden, Peter H. Raven Library
BioDiv Library

les-sources-du-nil:

Claudette Colbert as Cleopatra in Cleopatra
Dir. Cecil B. DeMille. Photo Universal Studios, 1934

les-sources-du-nil:

Claudette Colbert as Cleopatra in Cleopatra

Dir. Cecil B. DeMille. Photo Universal Studios, 1934

(Source: humus.livejournal.com, via ghastlydelights)